Ming Exhibition, British Museum

The exhibition featuered 21 international lenders including 10 Chinese institutions.

The exhibition featured 21 international lenders including 10 Chinese institutions.

This film demonstrates how AHRC-funded research underpinned a major exhibition exploring a golden age in China’s history. Click on the thumbnail on the left to see a short version of the film.

The exhibition explores the years 1400 – 1450, a pivotal 50 year period that transformed China during the rule of the Ming dynasty.

Some of the objects are more than 3000 years old

Some of the objects are more than 600 years old

We hear from the exhibition’s co-curators Jessica Harrison-Hall, British Museum and Professor Craig Clunas, University of Oxford who lead through the exhibition room at a time demonstrating some the finest and most historically important objects ever made in China.

The exhibition features a range of these spectacular objects – including exquisite porcelain, gold, jewellery, furniture, paintings, sculptures and textiles.

Many of the objects have only very recently been discovered and have never before been seen outside China.

Many of the objects have only very recently been discovered and have never before been seen outside China.

The carefully selected objects in this exhibition shed new light on this important part of world history that is little known in Europe. China’s internal transformation and connections with the rest of the world led to a flourishing of creativity from what was, at the time, the only global superpower.

 

Cardiff hill fort dig

A Medieval hill fort sits quietly within a social housing estate near the centre of Cardiff.

This short features Archaeologists from Cardiff University who have brought together the community that live in the estate around the site to help excavate some of its treasures.

acheol 4

Archeologists share skills and receive help.

The dig is just one example of themes funded by the AHRC’s huge Connecting Communities project which brings communities together with Art and Humanities research.

A medieval arrow head found at the site.

A medieval arrow head found at the site.

A visit from a local school.

A visit from a local school.

Filmed by David and Emi on a beautiful day in August 2013.

Digital Transfromations

This was a fun event and a chance to play with some special effects. A day at the Mermaid Centre in London where the AHRC brought together some talented researchers working at the interesection of the digitial and arts and humanities.

Imogeb Heap and her 'Musical Gloves' developed with help from the University of the West of England.

Imogen Heap and her ‘musical gloves’ developed with help from the University of the West of England.

The day was packed full of performances, presentations, discussions, demonstrations, networking and debate.

We're not really sure what this is.

We’re not really sure what this is.

The key question was how to transform scholarship using this deluge of data and technology.

Tech heaven.

Filmed and editied by David.

Political Posters

Political posters was the subject of Dr Chris Burgess’ s PhD. Chris’ s analysis culminated in an exhibition of  a selection of posters  in 2012 at Manchester’s People’s History Museum with funding from the AHRC. The Museum has more than 12,000 posters in its archives.

In this film Chris provides some insight into the messages both hidden and unintended in some of his favourites. Shot in stills and film in a single day by David in Manchester.

Dr Chris Burgess.

Billboard poster from the Conservative's 1979 Election campaign.

Hajj – Journey to the heart of Islam

Dr Venitia Porter, British Museum

The Hajj is the pilgrimage to Mecca. It is incumbent upon Muslims to go on Hajj once in their lifetimes.  British Museum curator Venetia Porter talks us through her stunning exhibition in this film commissioned by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Saudi artist Ahmad Maatar’s ‘Magnetism’.

Saudi artist Ahmad Maatar’s ‘Magnetism’. A tiny magnet. Around it iron filings. The iron filings look like pilgrims surrounding the Qa’aba – the cube-shaped structure, which is at the centre of the sanctuary.